Regional occupancy increases for widespread species but decreases for narrowly distributed species in metacommunity time series

Wu-Bing Xu*, Shane A. Blowes, Viviana Brambilla, Cher F. Y. Chow, Ada Fontrodona-Eslava, Inês S. Martins, Daniel McGlinn, Faye Moyes, Alban Sagouis, Hideyasu Shimadzu, Roel van Klink, Anne E. Magurran, Nicholas J. Gotelli, Brian J. McGill, Maria Dornelas, Jonathan M. Chase*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

While human activities are known to elicit rapid turnover in species composition through time, the properties of the species that increase or decrease their spatial occupancy underlying this turnover are less clear. Here, we used an extensive dataset of 238 metacommunity time series of multiple taxa spread across the globe to evaluate whether species that are more widespread (large-ranged species) differed in how they changed their site occupancy over the 10–90 years the metacommunities were monitored relative to species that are more narrowly distributed (small-ranged species). We found that on average, large-ranged species tended to increase in occupancy through time, whereas small-ranged species tended to decrease. These relationships were stronger in marine than in terrestrial and freshwater realms. However, in terrestrial regions, the directional changes in occupancy were less extreme in protected areas. Our findings provide evidence for systematic decreases in occupancy of small-ranged species, and that habitat protection could mitigate these losses in the face of environmental change.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1463
Number of pages11
JournalNature Communications
Volume14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Mar 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Regional occupancy increases for widespread species but decreases for narrowly distributed species in metacommunity time series'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this