Reaching for virtual objects: binocular disparity and the control of prehension

Paul Barry Hibbard, MF Bradshaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although, in principle, binocular cues provide veridical information about the three-dimensional shape of objects, our perception on the basis of these cues is distorted systematically. The consequences of these distortions may be less serious than they first appear, however, since in everyday life we rarely are required to judge the absolute shape, size or distance of objects. An important exception to this is in the control of prehension, where veridical information about an object to be grasped is required to plan the transport of the hand and to select the most appropriate grip. Here we investigate whether binocular cues provide accurate depth information for the control of prehension using disparity-defined, virtual objects and report that whilst binocular disparity can support prehensile movements, the kinematic indices, which reflect distance-reached and perceived size, show clear biases. These results suggest that accurate metric depth information for the control of prehension is not available from binocular cues in isolation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)196-201
Number of pages6
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume148
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2003

Keywords

  • prehension
  • binocular disparity
  • distance perception
  • size perception
  • MOTION PARALLAX
  • DEPTH
  • SIZE
  • CUES
  • MOVEMENTS
  • INFORMATION
  • DISTORTIONS
  • PERCEPTION
  • STEREOPSIS
  • DISTANCE

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