Post-conflict behavior of spectacled leaf monkeys (Trachypithecus obscurus). II. Contact with third parties

Kate Arnold, RA Barton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We studied the postconflict interactions with group members other than the former opponent in two groups of spectacled leaf monkeys, We found no evidence of redirection of aggression towards other group members. Victims and aggressors sought affiliative contacts with uninvolved third parties. There was no evidence for consolation-affiliative contact initiated by an uninvolved third party, directed towards victims of aggression-in either group when all affiliative behaviors were considered. However, embracing was a characteristic first-contact interaction between individuals involved in aggression and third parties. This finding mirrors the results concerning reconciliation in spectacled leaf monkeys Accordingly, embracing may be a true consolatory behavior in this species. When contacts with third parries occurred before or in the absence of reconciliation, the timing of such contacts fell within the rime window during which reconciliation normally occurs. These contacts also resulted in affiliation levels twice that of baseline levels, supporting the idea that these contacts may function as a form of substitute reconciliation. We discuss these results in light of recent theories concerning postconflict behavior in primates.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-286
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Primatology
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2001

Keywords

  • spectacled leaf monkeys
  • consolation
  • third party affiliation
  • POST-CONFLICT BEHAVIOR
  • MACAQUES MACACA-FASCICULARIS
  • WILD OLIVE BABOONS
  • JAPANESE MACAQUES
  • SOCIAL EVENTS
  • RECONCILIATION
  • REDIRECTION
  • CHIMPANZEES
  • CONSOLATION
  • STRESS

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