Poor readers' use of orthographic information in learning to read new words: A visual bias or a phonological deficit?

Alan M. Mcneel, Rhona S. Johnston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we examined the ability of 11-year-old poor readers and reading age controls to learn new print vocabulary. It was found that the poor readers were slower than the controls to learn to read a set of nonwords accurately but that, when asked to pick out the nonwords in a visual recognition memory task, they reached criterion much more quickly than did the controls. However, when the groups were compared on auditory recall of the items being learned, the poor readers were at a disadvantage. Thus, the poor readers developed a visual store for the nonwords more quickly than did the controls but were slower to establish phonological representations for the nonwords. It was concluded that the poor readers were slower to establish a form of sight word reading that was well underpinned in memory by connections between the letters in the spelling and the phonemes in the pronunciation, suggesting that they had a greater reliance on an orthographic-semantic pathway in word recognition than did the controls.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)629-640
Number of pages12
JournalMemory
Volume36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

Keywords

  • SHORT-TERM-MEMORY
  • DEVELOPMENTAL DYSLEXIA
  • CHILDREN
  • AWARENESS
  • SKILLS
  • RECOGNITION
  • MODEL
  • DISABILITIES
  • RETARDATION
  • ACQUISITION

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