Perceptual latencies to discriminate surface orientation in stereopsis

MF Bradshaw, Paul Barry Hibbard, B Gillam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The difference in sensitivity to stereoscopic surfaces oriented horizontally or vertically (the stereoscopic orientation anisotropy) can be redescribed as a difference in sensitivity to shear or compression transformations that relate the binocular images. The present experiment was designed to test this by dissociating the image transformation from the orientation of the surface. Surfaces were presented in isolation or in the presence of a surrounding frame that formed step and gradient discontinuities in the disparity field. Without discontinuities, observers required considerably more time to discriminate between surfaces differing in compression than between those differing in shear, irrespective of surface orientation. Disparity discontinuities facilitated the perception of the disparity gradients; minimum stimulus durations were reduced by over an order of magnitude when the reference frame was present. These results support the hypothesis that the disparity field is decomposed into different primitives during the recovery of depth and surface structure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)32-40
Number of pages9
JournalPerception and Psychophysics
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2002

Keywords

  • STEREOSCOPIC SLANT PERCEPTION
  • RANDOM-DOT STEREOGRAMS
  • DEPTH-PERCEPTION
  • MOTION-PARALLAX
  • DISPARITY
  • ANISOTROPIES
  • STIMULUS
  • CONTRAST

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