Ontogeny of sex differences in response to novel objects from adolescence to adulthood in Lister-hooded rats

De-Laine Cyrenne, Gillian Ruth Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

n humans, novelty-seeking behavior peaks in adolescence and is higher in males than females. Relatively, little information is available regarding age and sex differences in response to novelty in rodents. In this study, male and female Lister-hooded rats were tested at early adolescence (postnatal day, pnd, 28), mid-adolescence (pnd 40), or early adulthood (pnd 80) in a novel object recognition task (n = 12 males/females per age group). Males displayed a higher preference for the novel object than females at mid-adolescence, with no sex difference at early adolescence. Adult females interacted with the novel object more than adult males, but not when side biases were removed. Sex differences at mid-adolescence were not found in other measures, suggesting that the difference at this age was specific to situations involving choice of novelty. The results are considered in the context of age- and sex-dependent interactions between gonadal hormones and the dopamine system.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)670-676
Number of pages7
JournalDevelopmental Psychobiology
Volume53
Issue number7
Early online date31 Mar 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Ontogeny of sex differences in response to novel objects from adolescence to adulthood in Lister-hooded rats'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this