On the integration of object-oriented and process-oriented computation in persistent environments

Ronald Morrison, AL Brown, R Carrick, RCH Connor, Alan Dearle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Persistent programming is concerned with the construction of large and long lived systems of data [1,2]. Such systems have traditionally required concurrent access for two reasons. The first is that of speed, be it access speed for multiple users or execution speed for parallel activities. The second reason for concurrency is to control the complexity of large systems by decomposing them into parallel activities.

This process-oriented approach to system construction has much in common with the object-oriented approach. We will demonstrate, in this paper, the facilities of the language Napier [17] which allows the integration of the two methodologies along with a persistent environment to provide concurrently accessed object-oriented databases.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Object-Oriented Database Systems
Subtitle of host publication2nd International Workshop on Object-Oriented Database Systems Bad Münster am Stein-Ebernburg, FRG September 27–30, 1988 Proceedings
EditorsKlaus R. Dittrich
Place of PublicationBerlin, Heidelberg
PublisherSpringer
Pages334-339
ISBN (Electronic)9783540459811
ISBN (Print)9783540503453
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1988
Event2nd International Workshop on Object-Oriented Database Systems (OODBS) - Bad Münster am Stein-Ebernburg, Germany
Duration: 27 Sept 198830 Sept 1988
Conference number: 2

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
PublisherSpringer
Volume334
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference2nd International Workshop on Object-Oriented Database Systems (OODBS)
Abbreviated titleOODBS
Country/TerritoryGermany
CityBad Münster am Stein-Ebernburg
Period27/09/8830/09/88

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'On the integration of object-oriented and process-oriented computation in persistent environments'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this