Nice natives and mean migrants: the evolution of dispersal-dependent social behaviour in viscous populations

C. El Mouden*, A. Gardner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There has been much interest in the evolution of social behaviour in viscous populations. While low dispersal increases the relatedness of neighbours, which tends to promote the evolution of indiscriminate helping behaviour, it can also increase competition between neighbours, which tends to inhibit the evolution of helping and may even favour harming behaviour. In the simplest scenario, these two effects exactly cancel, so that dispersal rate has no impact on the evolution of helping or harming. Here, we show that dispersal rate does matter when individuals can adjust their social behaviour conditional on whether they have dispersed or whether they have remained close to their place of origin. We find that nondispersing individuals are weakly favoured to indiscriminately help their neighbours, whereas dispersing individuals are more readily favoured to indiscriminately harm their neighbours.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1480-1491
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Evolutionary Biology
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2008

Keywords

  • competition
  • cooperation
  • Hamilton's rule
  • harming
  • helping
  • kin selection
  • limited dispersal
  • viscosity
  • PROMOTE ALTRUISTIC BEHAVIOR
  • INCLUSIVE FITNESS
  • OVERLAPPING GENERATIONS
  • STRONG RECIPROCITY
  • SELECTION
  • COOPERATION
  • COMPETITION
  • CONFLICT
  • RECOGNITION
  • RELATEDNESS

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