Neuronal representation of disappearing and hidden objects in temporal cortex of the macaque.

CI Baker, C Keysers, T Jellema, B Wicker, David Ian Perrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neurons in the anterior regions of the banks of the superior temporal sulcus (STSa) of the macaque monkey respond to the sight of biologically significant stimuli such as faces, bodies and their motion. In this study the responses of STSa neurons were recorded during the gradual occlusion of the experimenter and other mobile objects behind screens at distances of 0.5-4 in from the monkeys. The experimenter or other object remained out of sight for 3-15 s before emerging back in to view. We describe a population of neurons (n=33) showing increased activity during the occlusion of objects that was maintained for up to 11 s following complete occlusion (when only the occluder itself was visible). This increase in activity was selective for the position of the occlusion within the testing room. Many neurons showed little or no change in activity prior to occlusion when the object or experimenter was completely in view. By coding for the presence and location of recently occluded objects, these responses may contribute to the perceptual capacity for object permanence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)375-381
Number of pages7
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume140
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2001

Keywords

  • macaque monkey
  • object permanence
  • high-level visual processing
  • superior temporal sulcus
  • ventral stream
  • POLYSENSORY AREA
  • PREMOTOR CORTEX
  • PRIMATE
  • MONKEY
  • DISTANCE
  • MOTION
  • SULCUS
  • MEMORY
  • FORM

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Neuronal representation of disappearing and hidden objects in temporal cortex of the macaque.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this