Microsatellite variation in Rufous Hummingbirds (Selasphorus rufus) and evidence for a weakly structured population

Ida Elizabeth Bailey, Gernot Segelbacher, Susan Denise Healy, T. Andrew Hurly, Josephine M. Pemberton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Rufous Hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus) population is declining in some areas of North America, but not in others. The reasons for the decline are, as yet, unknown. Understanding the genetic population structure of this species could be useful in understanding its dispersal behaviour and whether particular geographical areas should be treated as separate conservation units. We tested 16 microsatellite markers designed for other hummingbird species for amplification in Rufous Hummingbirds. Using six polymorphic markers, we found that the Rufous Hummingbird population was weakly structured such that birds breeding in central British Columbia could be distinguished from those breeding on Vancouver Island and those in Alberta, each several hundred kilometres away. Whether landscape features such as the Rocky Mountains and Fraser River Valley significantly affect dispersal patterns requires further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1029-1037
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Ornithology
Volume154
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

Keywords

  • Selasphorus rufus
  • Genetic structure
  • Microsatellite
  • Hummingbird
  • MULTILOCUS GENOTYPE DATA
  • MOLECULAR MARKER
  • DNA
  • INFERENCE
  • SAMPLES
  • DIFFERENTIATION
  • IDENTIFICATION
  • DEMOGRAPHY
  • DISPERSAL
  • LANDSCAPE

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Microsatellite variation in Rufous Hummingbirds (Selasphorus rufus) and evidence for a weakly structured population'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this