Low temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide: the influence of water and oxygen on the reactivity of a Co3O4 powder surface

F Grillo, MM Natile, A Glisenti*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

182 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, the effect of the presence of humidity and molecular oxygen on the low temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide on a Co3O4 powder surface was studied. The interaction between the probe molecules and the Co3O4 surface was investigated by means of diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy and quadrupolar mass spectrometry (QMS).

Carbon monoxide interacts with the Co3O4 surface and is converted to carbon dioxide at rather low temperature (T greater than or equal to 323 K); the formation of carbonate species is also evident. The reactivity of Co3O4 is strongly depressed by humidity: as a matter of fact, in steam conditions carbon monoxide oxidation is significant at temperatures higher than 523 K. Moreover, the formation of carbonate species is more evident than in dry conditions. The Co3O4 powder surface interacts with oxygen molecules at T greater than or equal to 323 K to originate several activated surface oxygen species. The activation with oxygen does not appear to facilitate significantly the formation of carbon dioxide. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-274
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Catalysis B: Environmental
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Apr 2004

Keywords

  • cobalt oxide
  • carbon monoxide
  • carbon dioxide
  • carbonates
  • chemisorption
  • XPS
  • FHR
  • three-way-catalyst
  • MGO SOLID-SOLUTIONS
  • X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON
  • CO OXIDATION
  • CATALYTIC PROPERTIES
  • INFRARED-SPECTRA
  • COBALT OXIDES
  • ADSORPTION
  • CHEMISORPTION
  • SPECTROSCOPY
  • METHANOL

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Low temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide: the influence of water and oxygen on the reactivity of a Co3O4 powder surface'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this