Linking hospital patient records for suspected or established acute coronary syndrome in a complex secondary care system: a proof-of-concept e-registry in National Health Service Scotland

Iain Findlay, Tamsin Morris, Ruiqi Zhang, Colin McCowan, Sarah Shield, Brian Forbes, Alex McConnachie, Kenneth Mangion, Colin Berry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims To implement secondary care electronic record linkage for patients hospitalized with suspected or known acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in a complex regional health care system and evaluate this e-Registry in terms of patterns of service delivery and 1-year outcomes.

Methods and results Existing electronic hospital records were linked to create episodes of care using (i) a patient administration system, (ii) invasive cardiovascular procedure referrals, and (iii) a catheter laboratory record. Data were extracted for admissions (1 October 2013-30 September 2014) with International Classification of Disease (ICD)-10 diagnosis of angina (I200-I209), myocardial infarction (I210-I229), other ischaemic heart disease (I240-I249) or heart failure (I50), linked to other sources to develop a secondary care ACS e-registry and analysed within a Safe Haven. Episodes of care were categorized into care pathways and evaluated in terms of patient characteristics, as well as service delivery metrics and outcomes including mortality. In all, 2327 patients had 2472 episodes of care. Diagnoses were hierarchically classified as ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) (586, 25.2%), non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) (1068, 45.9%), unspecified myocardial infarction (146, 6.3%), unstable angina (527, 22.6%) for the first hospitalization for each patient within the study period. Six care pathways were mapped. Percutaneous coronary intervention rate for STEMI was 80.2% and for NSTEMI 33.1%. Unadjusted all-cause mortality was 9.0% and 3.0% for STEMI and NSTEMI at 30 days, rising to 11.9% and 11.6% at 1 year. Analyses were validated by independent source data verification.

Conclusion The e-registry has enabled analysis of ACS hospitalizations in a complex health care system with implications for quality improvement and research.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-167
JournalEuropean Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes
Volume4
Issue number3
Early online date16 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018

Keywords

  • Acute coronary syndrome
  • Prognosis
  • Electronic health records
  • Registry

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Linking hospital patient records for suspected or established acute coronary syndrome in a complex secondary care system: a proof-of-concept e-registry in National Health Service Scotland'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this