Less cognitive conflict does not imply choice of the default option: Commentary on Kieslich and Hilbig (2014)

Kristian Ove Myrseth, Conny Wollbrant

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debatepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Kieslich and Hilbig (2014) employ a mouse-tracking technique to measure decision conflict in social dilemmas. They report that defectors exhibit more conflict than do cooperators. They infer that cooperation thus is the reflexive, default behavior. We
argue, however, that their analysis fails to discriminate between reflexive versus cognitively controlled behavioral responses. This is because cognitive conflict can emanate from resisting impulse successfully—or unsuccessfully.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-279
JournalJudgment and Decision Making
Volume10
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - May 2015

Keywords

  • Social dilemma
  • Cooperation
  • Intuition
  • Cognitive conflict
  • Self-control

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