Lateralized word recognition: Assessing the role of hemispheric specialization, modes of lexical access, and perceptual asymmetry

T R Jordan, G R Patching, A D Milner

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The processing advantage for words in the right visual field (RVF) has often been assigned to parallel orthographic analysis by the left hemisphere and sequential by the right. The authors investigated this notion using the Reicher-Wheeler task to suppress influences of guesswork and an eye-tracker to ensure central fixation. RVF advantages obtained for all serial positions and identical U-shaped serial-position curves obtained for both visual fields (Experiments 1-4). These findings were not influenced by lexical constraint (Experiment 2) and were obtained with masked and nonmasked displays (Experiment 3). Moreover, words and nonwords produced similar serial-position effects in each field, but only RVF stimuli produced a word-nonword effect (Experiment 4). These findings support the notion that left-hemisphere function underlies the RVF advantage but not the nation that each hemisphere uses a different mode of orthographic analysis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1192-1208
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume26
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2000

Keywords

  • INTERACTIVE ACTIVATION MODEL
  • RIGHT VISUAL-FIELDS
  • CEREBRAL ASYMMETRY
  • PRESENTED WORDS
  • CENTRAL RETINA
  • EXTERIOR LETTERS
  • EYE FIXATIONS
  • TIME COURSES
  • SUPERIORITY
  • INFORMATION

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