Kinetically induced compositional zoning in titanite: implications for accessory-phase/melt partitioning of trace elements

Bruce A. Paterson*, W. Edryd Stephens

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    62 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Usually it is assumed that the partitioning of trace elements into titanite in metaluminous granitoid plutonic environments takes place under equilibrium conditions and that compositional zoning is due solely to progressive changes in melt chemistry and/or mineral/melt partition coefficients. Examination of titanites from a variety of Caledonian metaluminous granitoids and related rocks has revealed that sector zoning is present, indicating disequilibrium partitioning. The sector zoning in titanites is defined principally by the distribution of the rare earth elements (REE), Y, Nb, Al and Fe. The REE, Y and Nb preferentially occur within the minor (100) sectors relative to the morphologically important (111) sectors. The reverse is true of Al and Fe which preferentially occur within the (111) sectors relative to the (100) sectors. The patterns of sector zoning are complicated by the fact that the relative growth rates of the various crystal faces fluctuated during growth. Sector zoning indicates that crystal-interface kinetics are responsible for the observed patterns of element partitioning. It is concluded that differences in the lateral-layerspreading rates of crystal faces bring about the sector zoning. The results have implications for the use of trace element partition coefficients in the modelling of fractionation processes.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)373-385
    Number of pages13
    JournalContributions to Mineralogy and Petrology
    Volume109
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 1992

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