Karyotypic aberrations of chromosomes 16 and 17 are related to survival in patients with breast cancer

R G Hislop, N Pratt, S C Stocks, C M Steel, M Sales, D Goudie, A Robertson, A M Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Breast cancer has a high incidence and associated mortality rate, yet little is known of the sequence of genetic events that underlie the clinical course.

Methods: The study was a comparative genomic hybridization analysis of 40 primary breast cancers with survival data at a mean of 8.4 years.

Results: The mean number of aberrations was 9.0, with a mean of 5.5 gains and 3.5 deletions per tumour. The most common aberrations were: gain of 1q (27 of 40), 8q (19 of 40) and 17q (13 of 40), and deletion of 17p (12 of 40) and 8p (11 of 40). These results are consistent with a distinctive pattern of large-scale (karyotypic) genetic change in primary breast cancer.

Conclusion: The novel findings of this study were that only women who were disease-free had loss of 16q (E-cadherin) in association with a gain of 16p, and 17p13 (p53) loss combined with 17q12 (HER2) amplification was found only in the cancers of women who developed recurrent disease. The karyotypic changes seen in primary breast cancer seem to be associated with outcome and point to the underlying genetic events.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1581-1586
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Plastic Surgery
Volume89
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2002

Keywords

  • COMPARATIVE GENOMIC HYBRIDIZATION
  • INCREASED COPY NUMBER
  • GENETIC ABERRATIONS
  • SOLID TUMORS
  • IN-SITU
  • AMPLIFICATION
  • CARCINOMAS
  • ONCOGENE
  • INSTABILITY
  • EVOLUTION

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