Innate predator recognition in newly hatched Atlantic salmon

LA Hawkins, Anne Elizabeth Magurran, JD Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is well established that fish can learn to associate odours from potential predators with risk and alter their behaviour accordingly. However, newly-hatched individuals have few opportunities for acquired predator recognition and may depend on unlearnt (innate) responses. We therefore considered whether newly hatched Atlantic salmon fry (alevins) exhibit innate predator recognition and whether this recognition could be improved by prior exposure to combined conspecific and predator (pike) odours. Our investigation showed that the response to pike odour was not affected by previous exposure to pike odour and conspecific tissue extract but was consistent with innate recognition of pike as predators. Trials conducted using odour front a non-piscivorous species confirmed that the fish were not simply reacting to a novel stimulus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1249-1262
Number of pages14
JournalBehaviour
Volume141
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2004

Keywords

  • Salmo salar
  • predator odour
  • recognition
  • learning
  • opercular rate
  • CHEMICAL CUES
  • ANTIPREDATOR BEHAVIOR
  • FATHEAD MINNOWS
  • CULTURAL TRANSMISSION
  • ACQUIRED RECOGNITION
  • PIMEPHALES-PROMELAS
  • ALARM SUBSTANCE
  • FRIGHT REACTION
  • CHINOOK SALMON
  • RAINBOW-TROUT

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