Imitative learning by captive western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in a simulated food-processing task

TS Stoinski, JL Wrate, N Ure, Andrew Whiten

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61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although field studies have suggested the existence of cultural transmission of foraging techniques in primates, identification of transmission mechanisms has remained elusive. To test experimentally for evidence of imitation in the current study, we exposed gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) to an artificial fruit foraging task designed by A. Whiten and D. M. Custance (1996). Gorillas (n = 6) watched a human model remove a series of 3 defenses around a fruit. Each of the defenses was removed using 1 of 2 alternative techniques. Subsequent video analysis of gorillas' behavior showed a significant tendency to copy the observed technique on 1 of the individual defenses and the direction of removal on another defense. This is the first statistically reliable evidence of imitation in gorillas. Sequence of defense removal was not replicated. The gorillas' responses were most similar to those of chimpanzees.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)272-281
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Comparative Psychology
Volume115
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2001

Keywords

  • CHIMPANZEES PAN-TROGLODYTES

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