"I Remember/Know/Guess that I knew-it-all-along!": Subjective experience versus objective measures of the knew-it-all-along effect.

Michelle Marie Arnold, D S Lindsay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The knew-it-all-along (KIA) effect occurs when individuals report that they previously knew something that they learned only recently. People often err when reporting the level of knowledge they had prior to feedback, but there is no research exploring the subjective experience of this effect. We incorporated a remember/just know/ guess judgment into a traditional (Experiment 1A: rating scale) and a modified-traditional (Experiment 1B: two-alternative forced choice) KIA procedure. Experiments 2A, 2B, and 3 were similar in format to Experiments I A and I B, but the trivia stimuli were replaced with word puzzles, which were expected to be better suited to inducing a feeling of having known it all along, because answers to trivia questions typically seem arbitrary, whereas word puzzles often give rise to ah-ha experiences. A KIA effect was observed in all the experiments, but an accompanying subjective feeling of having known it all along arose only with word puzzles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1854-1868
Number of pages15
JournalMemory and Cognition
Volume35
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2007

Keywords

  • HINDSIGHT BIAS
  • ACCESSIBILITY EXPERIENCES
  • RECOGNITION MEMORY
  • RECOLLECTIVE EXPERIENCE
  • COULD NEVER
  • RECALL
  • METAANALYSIS
  • PERCEPTION
  • PREDICTION
  • JUDGMENTS

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