Gregory Bateson's lost world: The anthropology of Haddon and Rivers continued and deflected

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Abstract

Gregory Bateson was one of the last and most distinguished products of the school of anthropology that Haddon and Rivers created in Cambridge after the Torres Strait Expedition. Beginning his career shortly after Rivers' death, Bateson used the interwar years to create a theoretical approach that continued and defected that of Haddon and Rivers. His major ethnography from this period, Naven, evidenced his complex academic positioning between the legacy of Rivers and the new paradigm emerging around Malinowski and Radcliffe-Brown. After the Second World War, Bateson's intellectual project emerged as even closer to Rivers' in both psychological and evolutionary dimensions. (C) 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)379-389
Number of pages11
JournalJOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
Volume35
Publication statusPublished - 1999

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