Gender differences in the dual-task effects on autobiographical memory retrieval during social problem solving

Barbara Dritschel, L Goddard, A Burton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A dual-task paradigm was used to explore the effects of cognitive load on social problem solving and autobiographical memory retrieval. The role that gender may play in mediating the relationship was also examined. Participants performed a secondary cask concurrently with two primary tasks: (a) a cueing task, and (b) the Means-End Problem-Solving (MEPS) Task, during which they were required to attend to the memories retrieved during solution generation. Two dual-task conditions were employed in order that two levels of secondary task difficulty could be explored. Level of difficulty proved to be an important factor in the effects of resource reduction on the two primary tasks. Retrieval during the MEPS was effected by both the easy and difficult secondary task whereas retrieval on the cueing task was affected by the difficult task only. The results also showed that females (in contrast to males) favoured a more detailed SPS style using a specific memory database. Consequently, under central executive pressure, females' performance was significantly affected while males' performance remained largely unchanged.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)611-627
Number of pages17
JournalBritish Journal of Psychology
Volume89
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1998

Keywords

  • LONG-TERM-MEMORY
  • WORKING-MEMORY
  • DEPRESSION
  • SELF
  • STRATEGIES
  • ATTENTION
  • STYLES

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