From littérature engagée to engaged translation: staging Jean-Paul Sartre’s theatre as a challenge to Franco’s rule in Spain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
11 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The practice of creating translations that ‘rouse, inspire, witness, mobilize, and incite to rebellion’ is described by Maria Tymoczko, following Jean-Paul Sartre's littérature engagée, as ‘engaged translation’. In Spain, under the Franco dictatorship (1939–1975), the theatre became a site of opposition to his rule and the creation of ‘engaged’ translations of foreign plays was one of the ways in which alternative social and political realities were transmitted to local audiences. This was particularly evident during the so-called apertura period (1962–1969), when Spain's political leaders embraced more liberal and outward-facing cultural policies as part of their efforts to ensure the regime's continuity. Drawing on archival evidence from the state censorship files held at Archivo General de la Administración (AGA) in Alcalá de Henares, this article considers how ‘engaged’ translations of Sartre's theatre were employed as instruments of cultural opposition to the Spanish dictatorship. It also argues that an analysis of the files both helps us to understand the role of censorship in shaping an official version of the past, and shines a light on the memory of a little-studied aspect of cultural activism in the Spanish theatre.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages17
JournalPerspectives: Studies in Translation Theory and Practice
VolumeLatest Articles
Early online date27 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 27 Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Theatre censorship
  • Translation and censorship
  • Spain under Franco
  • Jean- Paul Sartre
  • Engaged translation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'From littérature engagée to engaged translation: staging Jean-Paul Sartre’s theatre as a challenge to Franco’s rule in Spain'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this