'From cricket lover to terror suspect' - challenging representations of young British Muslim men

Claire Dwyer, Bindi Shah, Gurchathen Sanghera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In contemporary media and policy debates young British Muslim men are frequently described as experiencing cultural conflict, as alienated, deviant, underachieving, and as potential terrorists. In this article we seek to convey the everyday negotiations, struggles and structural constraints that shape the lives of young British Pakistani Muslim men in particular. We draw on interviews with British Pakistani Muslim men aged between 16 and 27 in Slough and Bradford. These are from a broader project, which focused on the link between education and ethnicity, and analysed the ways in which values and norms related to education, jobs and career advancement are accommodated, negotiated or resisted in the context of their families, communities and the wider society. A range of masculinities emerge in our data and we argue that these gender identities are defined in relational terms, to other ways of being Pakistani men and to being men in general, as well as to Pakistani femininities. While we recognise the fluidity, instability and situatedness of social identities, we also illustrate the ways in which masculinities are negotiated at the intersection of gender, ethnicity, class, religion, age and place and enacted within contexts which are themselves subjected to racialised and gendered processes. Our findings offer a varied and contextual understanding of British Pakistani masculinities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-136
Number of pages20
JournalGender, Place and Culture
Volume15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • masculinities
  • British Pakistani
  • Muslim
  • education
  • employment
  • MASCULINITIES
  • ETHNICITY
  • IDENTITY
  • POLITICS
  • RELIGION
  • GENDER
  • ASSIMILATION
  • ACHIEVEMENT
  • NARRATIVES
  • BRADFORD

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