Fitness consequences of potential assortative mating inside and outside a hybrid zone in Chorthippus parallelus (Orthoptera: Acrididae): implications for reinforcement and sexual selection theory

MICHAEL G. RITCHIE*, ROGER K. BUTLIN, GODFREY M. HEWITT

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have examined the fitness consequences of random and potentially non‐random matings within two populations taken from inside, and two from outside a hybrid zone in Chorthippus parallelus. When given the opportunity to mate non‐randomly, females from all populations laid egg pods more quickly than females obliged to mate at random. A range of fitness parameters measured on the offspring did not show increased fitness following potential non‐random mating for any population. However, in non‐hybrid populations, the sons of non‐randomly mated females had about twice the mating success of the sons of those females forced to mate at random, suggesting the existence of heritable variation for male reproductive success. Hybrid dysfunction did not occur amongst the offspring of randomly mated hybrid females, demonstrating that the lack of dysfunction within these populations is not due to the evolution of assortative mating within them.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)219-234
Number of pages16
JournalBiological Journal of the Linnean Society
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1992

Keywords

  • assortative mating
  • Chorthippus parallelus
  • fitness
  • grasshopper
  • Hybrid zone
  • reinforcement
  • sexual selection

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