First observation of Dorylus ant feeding in Budongo chimpanzees supports absence of stick-tool culture

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of stick- or probe-tools is a chimpanzee universal, recorded in all long-term study populations across Africa, except one: Budongo, Uganda. Here, after 25-years of observation, stick-tool use remains absent under both natural circumstances and strong experimental scaffolding. Instead, the chimpanzees employ a rich repertoire of leaf-tools for a variety of dietary and hygiene tasks. One use of stick-tools in other communities is in feeding on the aggressive Dorylus ‘army-ant’ species, consumed by chimpanzees at all long-term study sites outside of mid-Western Uganda. Here we report the first observation of army-ant feeding in Budongo, in which individuals from the Waibira chimpanzee community employed detached leaves to feed on a ground swarm. We describe the behaviour and discuss whether or not it can be considered tool-use, together with its implication for the absence of stick-tool ‘culture’ in Budongo chimpanzees.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)389-394
Number of pages6
JournalPrimates
Volume57
Issue number3
Early online date2 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2016

Keywords

  • Tool use
  • Chimpanzee
  • Pan troglodytes
  • Schweinfurthii
  • Culture

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'First observation of Dorylus ant feeding in Budongo chimpanzees supports absence of stick-tool culture'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this