Finding parallel functional pearls: automatic parallel recursion scheme detection in Haskell functions via anti-unification

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
14 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper describes a new technique for identifying potentially parallelisable code structures in functional programs. Higher-order functions enable simple and easily understood abstractions that can be used to implement a variety of common recursion schemes, such as maps and folds over traversable data structures. Many of these recursion schemes have natural parallel implementations in the form of algorithmic skeletons. This paper presents a technique that detects instances of potentially parallelisable recursion schemes in Haskell 98 functions. Unusually, we exploit anti-unification to expose these recursion schemes from source-level definitions whose structures match a recursion scheme, but which are not necessarily written directly in terms of maps, folds, etc. This allows us to automatically introduce parallelism, without requiring the programmer to structure their code a priori in terms of specific higher-order functions. We have implemented our approach in the Haskell refactoring tool, HaRe, and demonstrated its use on a range of common benchmarking examples. Using our technique, we show that recursion schemes can be easily detected, that parallel implementations can be easily introduced, and that we can achieve real parallel speedups (up to 23 . 79 × the sequential performance on 28 physical cores, or 32 . 93 × the sequential performance with hyper-threading enabled).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)669-686
JournalFuture Generation Computer Systems
Volume79
Issue numberPart 2
Early online date27 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2018

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Finding parallel functional pearls: automatic parallel recursion scheme detection in Haskell functions via anti-unification'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this