Field studies of Pan troglodytes reviewed and comprehensively mapped, focussing on Japan’s contribution to cultural primatology

William C. McGrew*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Field studies done over decades of wild chimpanzees in East, Central and West Africa have yielded impressive, cumulative findings in cultural primatology. Japanese primatologists have been involved in this advance from the outset, over a wide variety of topics. Here I review the origins and development of field studies of Pan troglodytes, then assess their progress based on analogy between cultural primatology and cultural anthropology, through four stages: natural history, ethnography, ethnology, and intuition. Then, I focus on six topics that continue to yield informative debate: technology, universals, nuanced variation, archaeology, applied primatology, and ecology. Finally, I offer a map of sites of field study of wild chimpanzees. It is clear that Japanese primatologists have made a significant contribution to East–West scientific exchange, especially at the field sites of Bossou and Mahale.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)237-258
Number of pages22
JournalPrimates
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Dec 2016

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Chimpanzee
  • Cultural primatology
  • Field study
  • Pan troglodytes

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