Family Dynamics Among Immigrants and Their Descendants in Europe: Current Research and Opportunities

Hill Kulu*, Amparo Gonzalez-Ferrer

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    81 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper reviews recent research on family dynamics among immigrants and their descendants in Europe. While there is a large body of literature on various aspects of immigrant lives in Europe, research on family dynamics has emerged only in the last decade. Studies based on individual-level longitudinal data and disaggregated measures of partnership and fertility behaviour have significantly advanced our understanding of the factors shaping family patterns among immigrants and their descendants and have contributed to research on immigrant integration. By drawing on recent research, this paper proposes several ways of further developing research on ethnic minority families. We emphasise the need to study family changes among immigrants and their descendants over their life courses, investigate various modes of family behaviour and conduct more truly comparative research to deepen our understanding of how ethnic minorities structure their family lives in different institutional and policy settings.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)411-435
    Number of pages25
    JournalEuropean Journal of Population
    Volume30
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014

    Keywords

    • Marriage
    • Cohabitation
    • Divorce
    • Separation
    • Fertility
    • Immigrants
    • Ethnic minorities
    • Second generation
    • Europe
    • LABOR-MARKET STATUS
    • MIXED-ETHNIC UNIONS
    • FORMER SOVIET-UNION
    • COUNTRY-OF-ORIGIN
    • PARTNER CHOICE
    • UNITED-STATES
    • TURKISH IMMIGRANTS
    • WESTERN-EUROPE
    • LIFE-COURSE
    • MIGRANT TRANSNATIONALISM

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