Exploring the use of overhypotheses by children and capuchin monkeys

Elisa Felsche, Patience Stevens, Christoph Völter, Daphna Buchsbaum, Amanda Seed

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of abstract higher-level knowledge (overhypotheses) allows humans to learn quickly from sparse data, and make predictions in new situations. Previous research has suggested that humans may be the only species capable of abstract knowledge formation, but this remains controversial, and there is also mixed evidence for when this ability emerges over human development. Kemp et al. (2007) proposed a computational model of overhypothesis formation from sparse data. We provide the first direct test of this model: an ecologically valid paradigm for testing two species, capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.) and 4-5-year-old human children. We compared performance to predictions made by models with and without the capacity to learn overhypotheses. Children's choices were consistent with the overhypothesis model predictions, whereas monkeys performed at chance level.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 41st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society
Subtitle of host publicationCreativity + Cognition + Computation, CogSci 2019
PublisherThe Cognitive Science Society
Pages1731-1737
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)0991196775, 9780991196777
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Event41st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society: Creativity + Cognition + Computation, CogSci 2019 - Montreal, Canada
Duration: 24 Jul 201927 Jul 2019

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 41st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society: Creativity + Cognition + Computation, CogSci 2019

Conference

Conference41st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society: Creativity + Cognition + Computation, CogSci 2019
Country/TerritoryCanada
CityMontreal
Period24/07/1927/07/19

Keywords

  • abstraction
  • animal cognition
  • cognitive development
  • computational modeling
  • generalization
  • Overhypotheses

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Exploring the use of overhypotheses by children and capuchin monkeys'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this