Experimental phenomenology of visual 3D space: Considerations from evolution, perception and philosophy

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Abstract

This chapter examines how we can approach the study of the phenomenology of the human perception of 3D space. Using a simplified model of the evolution of perception, it explains why conventional ideas regarding perception, phenomenology, content and reference fail to provide a comprehensive and integrated view of perceptual space. The differences between the standard Trichromacy account of color perception and Hering's phenomenologically motivated theory of Color Opponency are discussed. These differences are used to draw general distinctions between a ‘physicalist’ and ‘phenomenalist’ approach to perception. Drawing such distinctions allows us to develop a more integrated approach to the experimental phenomenology and psychophysics of 3D space. Furthermore, they explain standard conceptual pitfalls, such as why color is often viewed to be a more ‘phenomenal’ perceptual attribute than space or 3D shape in the science and philosophy of perception.

Original languageEnglish
Pages181-204
Specialist publicationWiley Handbook on Experimental Phenomenology
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Publication statusPublished - 31 Mar 2013

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