Exclusion and reappropriation: experiences of contemporary enclosure among children in three East Anglian schools

Richard D. G. Irvine*, Elsa Lee, Miranda Strubel, Barbara Bodenhorn

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Transformations of the landscapes which children inhabit have significant impacts on their lives; yet, due to the limited economic visibility of children’s relationships with place, they have little stake in those transformations. Their experience, therefore, illustrates in an acute way the experience of contemporary enclosure as a mode of subordination. Following fieldwork in three primary schools in South Cambridgeshire, UK, we offer an ethnographic account of children’s experiences of socio-spatial exclusion. Yet, we suggest that such exclusion is by no means an end-point in children’s relationships with place. Challenging assumptions that children are disconnected from nature, we argue that through play and imaginative exploration of their environments, children find ways to rebuild relationships with places from which they find themselves excluded.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)935-953
Number of pages19
JournalEnvironment and Planning D: Society and Space
Volume34
Issue number5
Early online date11 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016

Keywords

  • Children
  • Enclosure
  • Environmental change
  • Housing development
  • Play
  • Schools

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