Evidence-based policy: some pitfalls in the meeting of scientific research politics

Nina Holm Vohnsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A current ambition in welfare states as diverse as Denmark, the UK, and in the USA is to base political decision making on rigorous research (Cartwright et al 2009; Mulgan 2009; Bason 2010). Sound as this might seem the ambition has nevertheless been problematised by both policy-makers and the research community (e.g. Boden & Epstein 2006; House of Commons 2006; Cartwright et al 2009; Rod 2010; Vohnsen 2011). This article intends to draw out some general pitfalls in the curious meeting of science and politics by focusing on a particular attempt to make evidence-based legislation in Denmark (for a full account, see Vohnsen 2011). These insights will be relevant for the anthropological researcher of legislative processes who wishes to move beyond a merely discursive approach to the study of policy and politics.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-5
JournalAnthropology Today
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2013

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