Equal rates of repair of DNA photoproducts in transcribed and non-transcribed strands in Sulfolobus solfataricus

R Dorazi, D Gotz, S Munro, R Bernander, Malcolm Frederick White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway removes bulky lesions such as photoproducts from DNA. In both bacteria and eukarya, lesions located in transcribed strands are repaired significantly faster than those located in non-transcribed strands due to damage signalling by stalled RNA polymerase molecules: a phenomenon known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). TCR requires a mechanism for coupling the detection of stalled RNA polymerase molecules to the NER pathway, provided in bacteria by the Mfd protein. In the third domain of life, archaea, the pathway of NER is not well defined, there are no Mfd homologues and the existence of TCR has not been investigated. In this report we looked at rates of removal of photoproducts in three different operons of the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus following UV irradiation. We found no evidence for significantly faster repair in the transcribed strands of these three operons. The rate of global genome repair in S. solfataricus is relatively rapid, and this may obviate the requirement for a specialized TCR pathway. Significantly faster repair kinetics were observed in the presence of visible light, consistent with the presence of a gene for photolyase in the genome of S. solfataricus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)521-529
Number of pages9
JournalMolecular Microbiology
Volume63
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2007

Keywords

  • NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION-REPAIR
  • CYCLOBUTANE PYRIMIDINE DIMERS
  • ESCHERICHIA-COLI
  • COUPLED REPAIR
  • SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE
  • HYPERTHERMOPHILIC ARCHAEA
  • HUMAN FIBROBLASTS
  • DHFR GENE
  • B GENE
  • DAMAGE

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Equal rates of repair of DNA photoproducts in transcribed and non-transcribed strands in Sulfolobus solfataricus'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this