Energy-dependent uptake of N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, the neurotoxic metabolite of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, by mitochondria

R. R. Ramsay, T. P. Singer

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366 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an impurity in certain batches of illicit heroin substitutes, is known to cause parkinsonian symptoms and degeneration of the nigrostriatal cells in drug abusers and primates. Neurotoxicity depends on oxidation of MPTP by monoamine oxidase in brain cells to the dihydropyridinium form, which is further oxidized to N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), the 4-electron oxidation product. The latter is widely believed to be the compound responsible for neuronal destruction and the NADH dehydrogenase of the inner membrane has been postulated to be its target. This enzyme is inhibited, however, only at very high concentrations of MPP+, while the steady-state concentration of MPP+ in the nigrostriatal cells of MPTP-treated animals is several orders of magnitude lower. This paradox has now been resolved by the discovery of an energized uptake system for MPP+ in mitochondria which rapidly concentrates MPP+ to very high concentrations in the mitochondria at micromolar external concentrations. The process is dependent on the electrical gradient of the membrane, has a K(m) of about 5 mM, and is completely blocked by respiratory inhibitors and uncouplers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7585-7587
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume261
Issue number17
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 1986

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