Emotional Consequences of Collective Action Participation: Differentiating Self-Directed and Outgroup-Directed Emotions

Julia C. Becker, Nicole Tausch, Ulrich Wagner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present research examines the emotional and behavioral consequences of collective action participation. It demonstrates that "positive" and "negative" emotions can be experienced simultaneously as a result of collective action participation, yet it is important to distinguish outgroup-directed from self-directed emotions. Results of two experiments (N = 71 and N = 101) that manipulated participation in collective action illustrate that whereas collective action participants experience more outgroup-directed anger and contempt, they feel more self-directed positive affect. Furthermore, collective action participation predicted willingness to engage in moderate and radical collective actions in the future. These relations were mediated by outgroup-directed, but not by self-directed, emotions, suggesting that outgroup-directed rather than self-directed emotions play a crucial role in the maintenance of protest behavior. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1587-1598
Number of pages12
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume37
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

Keywords

  • collective action participation
  • self-directed emotions
  • outgroup-directed emotions
  • intergroup emotions
  • moderate collective action
  • radical collective action
  • SOCIAL-MOVEMENT PARTICIPATION
  • GROUP-BASED ANGER
  • ACTION TENDENCIES
  • IDENTITY MODEL
  • IDENTIFICATION
  • EMPOWERMENT
  • HAPPINESS
  • BENEFITS
  • EFFICACY
  • ACTIVISM

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