Embryonic cerebellar granule cells are resistant to necrosis induced by homocysteine

N S L Foister, C E Oldreive, J B Mackie, Gayle Helane Doherty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for a range of neurodegenerative conditions, yet its effects in the developing nervous system have been poorly elucidated. We studied the in vitro response of cerebellar granule neurons (CGCs) to homocysteine. We have shown that embryonic CGCs are resistant to homocysteine-induced neurotoxicity, whilst postnatal CGCs are not. This is the first demonstration of a neuronal population undergoing a developmental switch in their response to homocysteine. Greater understanding of this change may have important implications for both neurodegenerative conditions and neurodevelopmental disorders. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-89
Number of pages5
JournalDevelopmental Brain Research
Volume160
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Nov 2005

Keywords

  • caspase
  • cerebellum
  • development
  • homocysteine
  • mouse
  • neurodegeneration
  • PLASMA HOMOCYSTEINE
  • IN-VIVO
  • DISEASE
  • APOPTOSIS
  • NEURONS
  • DEATH
  • CULTURES
  • FOLATE

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Embryonic cerebellar granule cells are resistant to necrosis induced by homocysteine'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this