Dombey in Zhitomir, Pip in Taganrog: reading Dickens ‘as if for life’ in Russia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Many Russian writers have been eager to demonstrate their intense childhood attachment to the novels of Charles Dickens. This article focuses on the narrative strategies used by Vladimir Korolenko (1853–1921) and Nelli Morozova (1924–2015) in their autobiographies to convey the importance of reading Dickens to their formation as writers. It argues that David Copperfield offers a useful model for understanding how Korolenko and Morozova write about reading, and that, rather than distancing Dickens and his characters from their global readership, translations increase proximity and facilitate empathetic readings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)316-335
JournalModern Language Review
Volume114
Issue number2
Early online date1 Apr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Dombey in Zhitomir, Pip in Taganrog: reading Dickens ‘as if for life’ in Russia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this