Does late-acting self-incompatibility (LSI) show family clustering? Two more species of bignoniaceae with LSI: Dolichandra cynanchoides and Tabebuia nodosa

P E Gibbs, M B Bianchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

By means of hand pollination experiments and fluorescence microscopy the breeding systems and pollen tube growth were studied in Dolichandra cynanchoides and Tabebuia nodosa, two bignoniaceous species of the Chaco woodland of NE Argentina. Both species abscised all selfed pistils within 4-8 d although self pollen tubes grew successfully to the ovary and penetrated many ovules. Both species therefore show 'late-acting self-incompatibility' (LSI) or 'ovarian sterility' (OS) type control of selfing. LSI-OS has been reported in 17 species of the Bignoniaceae, and is also clustered in families such as the Bombacaceae-Sterculiaceae, Fabaceae and Myrtaceae. The implications of such family clustering are discussed, with regard to current hypotheses for the action of LSI-OS phenomena. (C) 1999 Annals of Botany Company.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)449-457
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Botany
Volume84
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1999

Keywords

  • Bignoniaceae
  • Dolichandra cynanchoides
  • Tabebuia nodosa
  • Chaco
  • late-acting self-incompatibility
  • ovarian sterility
  • EPILOBIUM-OBCORDATUM ONAGRACEAE
  • POLLEN-TUBE GROWTH
  • BREEDING SYSTEMS
  • REPRODUCTIVE-BIOLOGY
  • BRAZILIAN CERRADOS
  • POLLINATION
  • BOMBACACEAE
  • MYRTACEAE
  • FERTILITY
  • MECHANISM

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