Do low-income neighbourhoods have the least green space? a cross-sectional study of Australia's most populous cities

Thomas Astell-Burt, Xiaoqi Feng, Suzanne Mavoa, Hannah M Badland, Billie Giles-Corti

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    115 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    An inequitable distribution of parks and other 'green spaces' could exacerbate health inequalities if people on lower incomes, who are already at greater risk of preventable diseases, have poorer access.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number292
    Number of pages11
    JournalBMC Public Health
    Volume14
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 31 Mar 2014

    Keywords

    • Australia
    • Environment
    • Green space
    • Health
    • Income
    • Inequity
    • Neighbourhood
    • Public open space

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