Do Animals Have Culture?

Kevin Neville Laland, William John Edward Hoppitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

266 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Culture is probably not rare in animals, although hard experimental evidence is lacking. The strongest case for culture is found in the species most amenable to experimental manipulation, rather than in nonhuman primates. Human culture is much more likely to be cumulative than animal culture, but the reasons for this are not well established. At this point, there is no reason to assume that cumulative culture depends critically on teaching, imitation, language, or perspective-taking. Currently, animals are being judged according to stricter criteria than humans.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)150-159
Number of pages10
JournalEvolutionary Anthropology
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2003

Keywords

  • social learning
  • innovation
  • teaching
  • imitation
  • niche construction
  • CHIMPANZEES PAN-TROGLODYTES
  • COTTON-TOP TAMARINS
  • CORAL-REEF FISH
  • WILD CHIMPANZEES
  • FORAGING INNOVATION
  • SOCIAL INFLUENCES
  • MOLOTHRUS ATER
  • TRANSMISSION
  • BEHAVIOR
  • TRADITIONS

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