Differences in cue use and spatial memory in men and women

Catherine M. Jones, Susan Denise Healy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Men and women differ in their ability to solve spatial problems. There are two possible proximate explanations for this: (i) men and women differ in the kind (and value) of information they use and/or (ii) their cognitive abilities differ with respect to spatial problems. Using a simple computerized task which could be solved either by choosing an object based on what it looked like, or by its location, we found that the women relied on the object's visual features to solve the task, while the men used both visual and location information. There were no differences between the sexes in memory for the visual features of the objects, but women were poorer than men at remembering the locations of objects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2241-2247
Number of pages7
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume273
Issue number1598
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Sept 2006

Keywords

  • sex differences
  • spatial cognition
  • humans
  • DIMORPHIC COGNITIVE-STYLE
  • SEX-DIFFERENCES
  • FEMALE ADVANTAGE
  • MAZE PERFORMANCE
  • ABILITY
  • NAVIGATION
  • LOCATION
  • TASK
  • ENVIRONMENT
  • HYPOTHESIS

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