Dietary inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A

Sarah E. Dixon Clarke, Rona R. Ramsay

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inhibition of monoamine oxidase is one way to treat depression and anxiety. The information now available on the pharmacokinetics of flavonoids and of the components of tobacco prompted an exploration of whether a healthy diet (with or without smoking) provides active compounds in amounts sufficient to partially inhibit monoamine oxidase. A literature search was used to identify
dietary monoamine oxidase inhibitors, the levels of these compounds in foods, the pharmacokinetics of the absorption and distribution, and tissue levels observed. An estimated daily intake and the expected tissue concentrations were
compared with the measured efficacies of the compounds as inhibitors of monoamine oxidases. Norharman, harman and quercetin dietary presence, pharmacokinetics, and tissue levels were consistent with significant levels reaching neuronal monoamine oxidase from the diet or smoking; 1,2,3,4-
tetrahydroisoquinoline, eugenol, 1-piperoylpiperidine, and coumarin were not. Quercetin was equipotent with norharman as a monoamine oxidase A inhibitor and its metabolite, isorhamnetin, also inhibits. Total quercetin was the highest
of the compounds in the sample diet. Although bioavailability was variable depending on the source, a healthy diet contains amounts of quercetin that might give sufficient amounts in brain to induce, by monoamine oxidase A inhibition, a small decrease in neurotransmitter breakdown.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1031-1041
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neural Transmission
Volume114
Issue number7
Early online date29 Dec 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Antidepressant
  • Harman
  • Monoamine oxidase A
  • Norharman
  • Quercetin

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