Daily geographies of caregivers: mobility, routine, scale

J Wiles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

155 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The bulk of care provided to elderly people living in the community and needing assistance is provided informally by family and friends. This paper investigates themes from an interpretation of interviews with informal caregivers about their experiences of caring for a frail, ill, or disabled elderly person at home. These themes include mobility, routine, and inter-relationships of scale. The caregivers' narratives illustrate the interconnected nature of physical, material and social, emotional aspects of care, and the profound spatial and social impact of providing informal care to a family member on their everyday lives. These are often at odds with political and social constructions of what it means to care at home. Concepts of space, place, and time are shown to be a helpful framework through which to understand issues and experiences of caring. The social and the physical aspects of the many interconnected scales and places which caregivers negotiate on an everyday basis both shape and are shaped by caregiving. (C) 2002 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1307-1325
Number of pages19
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume57
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2003

Keywords

  • caregiving
  • experience
  • mobility
  • routine
  • scale
  • public
  • private
  • LONG-TERM-CARE
  • NEW-ZEALAND
  • ELDERLY RELATIVES
  • HEALTH
  • GENDER
  • EXPERIENCE
  • ONTARIO
  • WOMEN
  • BODY
  • PERSPECTIVES

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