Déjà vu experiences in healthy subjects are unrelated to laboratory tests of recollection and familiarity for word stimuli

Akira Robert O'Connor, Chris Moulin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Recent neuropsychological and neuroscientific research suggests that people who experience more déjà vu display characteristic patterns in normal recognition memory. We conducted a large individual differences study (n = 206) to test these predictions using recollection and familiarity parameters recovered from a standard memory task. Participants reported déjà vu frequency and a number of its correlates, and completed a recognition memory task analogous to a Remember-Know procedure. The individual difference measures replicated an established correlation between déjà vu frequency and frequency of travel, and recognition performance showed well-established word frequency and accuracy effects. Contrary to predictions, no relationships were found between déjà vu frequency and recollection or familiarity memory parameters from the recognition test. We suggest that déjà vu in the healthy population reflects a mismatch between errant memory signalling and memory monitoring processes not easily characterised by standard recognition memory task performance.
Original languageEnglish
Article number881
Number of pages9
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Nov 2013

Keywords

  • Déjà vu
  • Memory
  • Recognition
  • Familiarity
  • Recollection

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