Cutaneous larva migrans

Stephen H. Gillespie*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

International travel and increasingly exotic diets have resulted in an increase in cases of cutaneous larva migrans in industrialized countries. A broader spectrum of clinical presentation and complications of cutaneous larva migrans is recognized by clinicians. A new syndrome, eosinophilic enteritis, has been described in Australia and may be more widespread as new diagnostic tests are used more widely. Other causes of cutaneous migration, such as gnathostomiasis and sparganosis, should be considered, and a recent outbreak of gnathostomiasis in Mexico suggests that clinicians must be alert to these unusual infections arising in patients outside their traditional distribution. This review and consensus statement summarizes current knowledge regarding the health problems of children at high altitude. This review and consensus statement summarizes current knowledge regarding the health problems of children at high altitude. This review and consensus statement summarizes current knowledge regarding the health problems of children at high altitude.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)50-53
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Infectious Disease Reports
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2004

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cutaneous larva migrans'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this