Cue combination in the motion correspondence problem

Paul Barry Hibbard, MF Bradshaw, RA Eagle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Image motion is a primary source of visual information about the world. However, before this information can be used the visual system must determine the spatio-temporal displacements of the features in the dynamic retinal image, which originate from objects moving in space. This is known as the motion correspondence problem. We investigated whether cross-cue matching constraints contribute to the solution of this problem, which would be consistent with physiological reports that many directionally selective cells in the visual cortex also respond to additional visual cues. We measured the maximum displacement limit (D-max) for two-frame apparent motion sequences. D-max increases as the number of elements in such sequences decreases. However, in our displays the total number of elements was kept constant while the number of a subset of elements, defined by a difference in contrast polarity binocular disparity or colour, was varied. D-max increased as the number of elements distinguished by a particular cue was decreased. D-max was affected by contrast polarity for all observers, but only some observers were influenced by binocular disparity and others by colour information. These results demonstrate that the human visual system exploits local, cross-cue matching constraints in the solution of the motion correspondence problem.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1369-1374
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences
Volume267
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jul 2000

Keywords

  • motion correspondence
  • cue combination
  • binocular disparity
  • colour
  • contrast polarity
  • TEMPORAL VISUAL AREA
  • APPARENT MOTION
  • BINOCULAR DISPARITY
  • ELEMENT DENSITY
  • MACAQUE MONKEY
  • RHESUS-MONKEY
  • PERCEPTION
  • SEGMENTATION
  • STEREOPSIS
  • COLOR

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cue combination in the motion correspondence problem'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this