Coordination chemistry in the solid state

P G Bruce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Salts, e.g. LiPF6, may be dissolved in solid polymers, e.g. (CH2-CH2-O)(n). Dissolution is driven by the complexation of the cations by the donor groups on the polymer chains. The resulting solids are coordination compounds with infinite ligands. They form a vital bridge between coordination chemistry in solution and more classical solid-state chemistry. The solid coordination compounds are often referred to as polymer electrolytes. In this paper I present a view of the coordination chemistry of these fascinating compounds which yield elegant structures as well as forming the basis of high technology devices for the 21st century. Topics covered include: the forces driving complexation; the major ligands and complexes; the structures of several model systems; and the physical properties and applications of the materials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)415-436
Number of pages22
JournalPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. A, Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Volume354
Issue number1706
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Feb 1996

Keywords

  • POLYMER ELECTROLYTES
  • POLY(ETHYLENE OXIDE)
  • CRYSTAL-STRUCTURE
  • ION-TRANSPORT
  • COMPLEXES

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Coordination chemistry in the solid state'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this