Consistency of Encoding in Monkey Visual Cortex

MC Wiener, Michael William Oram, Z Lui, BJ Richmond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Are different kinds of stimuli (for example, different classes of geometric images or naturalistic images) encoded differently by visual cortex, or are the principles of encoding the same for all stimuli? We examine two response properties: (1) the range of spike counts that can be elicited from a neuron in epochs representative of short periods of fixation (up to 400 msec), and (2) the relation between mean and variance of spike counts elicited by different stimuli, that together characterize the information processing capabilities of a neuron using the spike count code. In monkey primary visual cortex (V1) complex cells, we examine responses elicited by static stimuli of four kinds (photographic images, bars, gratings, and Walsh patterns); in area TE of inferior temporal cortex, we examine responses elicited by static stimuli in the sample, nonmatch, and match phases of a delayed match-to-sample task. In each area, the ranges of mean spike counts and the relation between mean and variance of spike counts elicited are sufficiently similar across experimental conditions that information transmission is unaffected by the differences across stimulus set or behavioral conditions [although in 10 of 27 (37%) of the V1 neurons there are statistically significant but small differences, the median difference in transmitted information for these neurons was 0.9%]. Encoding therefore appears to be consistent across experimental conditions for neurons in both V1 and TE, and downstream neurons could decode all incoming signals using a single set of rules.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8210-8221
Number of pages12
JournalThe Journal of Neuroscience
Volume21
Issue number20
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2001

Keywords

  • coding
  • visual
  • cortex
  • V1
  • TE
  • inferior temporal cortex
  • monkey
  • natural images
  • mean-variance relation
  • INFERIOR TEMPORAL CORTEX
  • LATERAL GENICULATE-NUCLEUS
  • MOTION-SENSITIVE NEURONS
  • TWO-DIMENSIONAL PATTERNS
  • SINGLE NEURONS
  • NATURAL SCENES
  • SIMPLE CELLS
  • INFORMATION-TRANSMISSION
  • RESPONSE VARIABILITY
  • CODING STRATEGIES

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