Conflicts between humans over wildlife management: on the diversity of stakeholder attitudes and implications for conflict management

K Marshall, Rehema White, A Fischer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

122 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conflicts involving wildlife are, in essence, often conflicts between human parties with differing wildlife management objectives. However, the study and management of wildlife conflicts often focuses on the ecological context without addressing disagreements between people over these objectives. This research uses quantitative approaches to examine actors' views on a complex wildlife-related conflict: a raptor of conservation concern that impacts on game-bird management. Four dominant elements of the debate emerged from initial semi-structured interviews: perceptions of conflict related issues; perceptions of each other; perceived barriers to consensus within the debate; and assessment of proposed practical management solutions. A quantitative survey that built on these elements demonstrates the degree to which perceptions differ between groups and how local variation in these elements may be obscured in a regional or national level debate. The findings emphasise the importance of understanding the social issues involved in wildlife related conflicts if management aims are to be agreed and achieved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3129-3146
Number of pages18
JournalBiodiversity and Conservation
Volume16
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2007

Keywords

  • attitudes
  • biodiversity
  • conflict
  • conservation
  • hen harrier
  • red grouse
  • stakeholders
  • wildlife management
  • RED GROUSE
  • NATURE CONSERVATION
  • HEN HARRIERS
  • RESOLUTION
  • PREDATION
  • FRAMEWORK
  • SCOTLAND
  • SCIENCE
  • EUROPE
  • PREY

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