Concepts relating magnetic interactions, intertwined electronic orders, and strongly correlated superconductivity

J. C. Seamus Davis*, Dung-Hai Lee

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

123 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Unconventional superconductivity (SC) is said to occur when Cooper pair formation is dominated by repulsive electron-electron interactions, so that the symmetry of the pair wave function is other than an isotropic s-wave. The strong, on-site, repulsive electron-electron interactions that are the proximate cause of such SC are more typically drivers of commensurate magnetism. Indeed, it is the suppression of commensurate antiferromagnetism (AF) that usually allows this type of unconventional superconductivity to emerge. Importantly, however, intervening between these AF and SC phases, intertwined electronic ordered phases (IP) of an unexpected nature are frequently discovered. For this reason, it has been extremely difficult to distinguish the microscopic essence of the correlated superconductivity from the often spectacular phenomenology of the IPs. Here we introduce a model conceptual framework within which to understand the relationship between AF electron-electron interactions, IPs, and correlated SC. We demonstrate its effectiveness in simultaneously explaining the consequences of AF interactions for the copper-based, iron-based, and heavy-fermion superconductors, as well as for their quite distinct IPs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17623-17630
Number of pages8
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume110
Issue number44
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Oct 2013

Keywords

  • high-Tc superconductivity
  • strong correlations
  • fermiology
  • HIGH-TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTIVITY
  • VALENCE BOND STATE
  • T-C SUPERCONDUCTOR
  • CUPRATE SUPERCONDUCTORS
  • PSEUDOGAP STATE
  • PHYSICS
  • INSTABILITY
  • TRANSITION
  • COMPLEXITY
  • ANISOTROPY

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